21 acre parcel of land made available with potential for 33 housing units

Although no discussions have yet been held with planning officers, the agent says there is the potential for 33 dwellings on this parcel of land.

Land at Perowne Way Sandown

A 21 acre plot of land off Perowne Way, Sandown has come up for sale – which could become home to over 30 dwellings.

Although no discussions have yet taken place with IWC planning officers, the agent says that initial discussions have been held with access owners.

Architects add there is the potential for 33 housing units, “leaving the rest of the acreage as paddock, pasture, or amenity land”.

The mature hedges that are currently screening the site would remain to ensure “a degree of privacy to both occupiers of neighbouring properties”.

Part of Island Plan Core Strategy
The agent said,

“The land has already been promoted under the Island Plan Core Strategy and with that in mind our in-house architectural team has undertaken a development brief to show what could be possible.”

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Friday, 11th August, 2017 12:21pm

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Filed under: Isle of Wight Council, Isle of Wight News, Sandown, Top story

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8 Comments

  1. Are they building it on stilts?

  2. As if every property would get over half an acre they are more likely to build many more than that to make more money.

  3. garyeldridge


    12.Aug.2017 12:43pm

    According to the Environment Flood Maps, this area is prone to flooding and I know that it does most years. If anyone buys this plot to build on they are taking on more than they realise.

    • Steve Goodman


      13.Aug.2017 9:56am

      On the plus side:

      1. Realisation is growing that flooding and other very inconvenient events are continuing to increase alarmingly because of the damage we are still doing to our climate and our only home. One easy option for anyone interested in learning more about what’s happening and what we need to do about it is to see the new Al Gore film ‘An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power’, on general release from August 18th.

      2. Anyone interested in new Island housing units on an appealing and exceptional restored brownfield site, rather than a flood-prone greenfield site, may have seen that some are now available at the former Frank James Memorial Hospital. Three modern apartments are complete, work continues on the next two, and about a dozen more will follow.

  4. Mark L Francis


    12.Aug.2017 6:11pm

    I should have thought there was enough derelict land in Sandown without encroaching on the country. I remember when Perowne Way was all fields.

  5. Robert Jones


    12.Aug.2017 7:55pm

    Sick to death of these greedy sods and the agents, all too often former IW council officers acting as gamekeepers turned poachers, who operate on their behalf. It’s the absurdity of the English planning system that allows them to proliferate, and until the system is changed they’ll continue to parasitize on it.

  6. You have got to wonder about this.

    The same amount of land without planning permission for sale along the Racecourse in Newport is twice the price of this plot in Sandown. Okay, land in Newport may command a premium but why is this land being sold so cheaply? Often single house plots are nearly £200,000.

    And do we have to accept the island is going to be covered in houses and concrete without the infrastructure to support it just because of a flawed Island Plan?

  7. electrickery


    14.Aug.2017 9:55am

    The Island Plan is fine – unfortunately nobody reads it.

    “a degree of privacy to both occupiers of neighbouring properties” – just two of them, are there?

    One would expect IWC to ask a reasonable but not excessive price for the land on our behalf, balancing need for housing (especially affordable) against value for ratepayers. By building multiple-occupancy here, a developer could produce affordable properties with pleasant surroundings – a win-win. That might even mitigate the effects of flooding. This is an opportunity for an enlightened development and IWC should be a partner in that, but I won’t hold my breath.

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