Isle of Wight Foodbank need vital donations during summer holidays

‘Help is here but we need your support’ say Isle of Wight Foodbank, as new stats show half of children helped by foodbanks over summer holiday months are primary school students.

foodbank warehouse

Sarah shares this latest news from Isle of Wight Foodbank. Ed


New data published by anti-poverty charity The Trussell Trust reveals that last summer 47% of children who received support from foodbanks in its network were 5-11 years old.

The figures also show that 4,412 more three day emergency food supplies were given to children in July and August 2016 than in the previous two months.

Seek help if you are struggling
The Foodbank is working with local schools and Children’s Centres to help, and urges local families to seek help if they find themselves struggling this summer.

67,506 three day emergency food supplies were provided for children by The Trussell Trust’s foodbank network in July and August 2016 compared to 63,094 in May and June 2016. Between July and August 2016, of all 67, 506 three day emergency food supplies from The Trussell Trust foodbank network that went to children:

  • 27% went to 0-4 year olds
  • 47% went to 5-11 year olds
  • 21% went to 12-16 year olds
  • 5% went to children for whom their age was not known

Donations vital more now than ever
Reacting to the new statistics, Isle of Wight Foodbank has urged local families to seek help if they find themselves struggling this summer, and asks local people able to donate to support their work in the community.

Hannah King, Foodbank Manager says:

“Lots of people are just getting by day-to-day but find their income simply won’t stretch to meet the extra pressure of missing free school meals or paying for extra childcare during the holidays. Help is here on the Island.

“The foodbank really is run for the community, by the community; it’s all about helping each other and recognizing that nobody should face going hungry.

“We can only continue to provide this crucial support with the community’s help; we rely on local donations to run the foodbank. An emergency food parcel, cup of tea and a listening ear at the foodbank can have such an impact, so any donations will make a real difference.”

Primary school children helped all year round
The new age insights from The Trussell Trust’s data collection system also reveal the percentage of primary school children helped by foodbanks is consistently high all-year round (46% of all children referred between April 2016 and March 2017 were between 5-11), highlighting the need for support throughout the year, not only in the holidays.

Foodbanks will continue to work all-year round to establish strong working relationships with local agencies to ensure families in need can be referred to the foodbank for emergency food and support.

Samantha Stapley, Operations Manager for England at The Trussell Trust, said:

“Over a third of all the food distributed by foodbanks in our network consistently goes to children, but these new figures show 5 to 11 year-olds are more likely than other children to receive a foodbank’s help. This highlights just how close to crisis many families are living.

“We can all make a difference – checking which food your local foodbank is running low on and donating to make sure emergency food is available when people are referred to help is a simple and effective way to get involved. You could be helping a family that lives on your street.”

Shocking statistics
The Rt. Rev the Lord Bishop of Truro Tim Thornton, said:

“It is shocking to read the statistics and the breakdown provided by The Trussell Trust. That so many primary age children are going without food in our country is of great concern. It is good that so many voluntary organisations, the vast majority of which are based on churches are working to provide help for families during the summer holidays.

“It is very good that the community wants to help and work with those less fortunate and that is a key part of the gospel values. It is however also important that we keep trying to understand the deeper reasons why this situation is as it is.”

Friday, 4th August, 2017 5:23pm

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10 Comments

  1. Steve Goodman


    4.Aug.2017 6:10pm

    As the need for foodbank donations is vital it might even get noticed by MP Bob, whose government’s policies are not unconnected.

    (Bob, recently: “…I believe pubs are vital for the good of our society…”

    Bob, even more recently:”… fast broadband speeds are now just as vital as gas, electricity and water connections …”

    Bob, so far, on the vital desperate needs of the vital Island Foodbank: ?)

  2. electrickery


    5.Aug.2017 10:13am

    Cap’n Bob is proving to be as we all expected – all gas and no substance.

    The Foodbank situation is a disgrace to a civilised society – perhaps we in Britain can no longer make that claim? There are banana republics better governed than here.

  3. It is amazing how seamlessly people can move from condemning one Island MP to another.

    • laurentian


      7.Aug.2017 7:02pm

      Ah well, both Conservatives you see, so both ripe for condemnation . . .

    • Suruk the Slightly Miffed


      7.Aug.2017 8:16pm

      And your point is?

      Steve makes an excellent point. Seely is grandstanding about the importance of pubs and broadband in a constituency where some folk can’t afford to feed their families.

    • Steve Goodman


      8.Aug.2017 9:22am

      It is amazing how easily amazed some people can be, it is amazing how badly most people in power do when it comes to being willing and able to move to halt and reverse our life-threatening environmental and economic damage, and it is amazing how many people can’t move from electing MPs deserving less condemnation.

  4. The piggy bank is empty.
    I wonder why?

    “India launches £383m submarine, while taking £47m in FOREIGN AID from Britain”

    Well I don’t, but I do wonder how many will advocate foodbank before foreign aid.
    Charity begins at home.

    • Foreign aid should be just that – aid. Not money.
      We should be sending the things that are needed most straight to the people that need them most, not giving foreign governments money.
      If foreign aid was done properly, corruption could be eliminated, the aid would get to the people who actually need it, and there would be enough left over to support people on low incomes at home.

      Of course, if the Tories stopped messing about with the ‘living wage’ and actually raised the minimum wage which employers are required to stick to, perhaps there would be no need for foodbanks at all.
      Or perhaps Bob Seeley could have a fundraising drive amongst his real ale pub mates. Perhaps a couple of pints less each week would mean money donated to people who can’t afford to feed their kids.

  5. electrickery


    8.Aug.2017 8:16pm

    Carl: You are perhaps referring to “tied aid”, grossly abused and subsequently discredited a long time ago.
    Aid has become a tool of foreign policy, and that means influencing foreign politicians. If that means greasing their palms, well, welcome to the modern world.

    When will a government (of any persuasion) have the b***s to recognise that we want more from the State than we wish to pay for, and the only solution is more aggressive taxation? (given that we aren’t going to become a manufacturing nation again any time soon – thanks, Maggie!)

    • The last Labour government tried more aggressive taxation. The tories dropped the 50p tax rate, with Osbourne claiming that revenue had gone up by £8billion.
      This was exposed as a lie, which is to be expected from politicians.
      Meanwhile, greasing palms whilst people cannot afford the basics in life is not an option that should ever be considered, especially when people need to use foodbanks to feed their kids.
      So, if you want a government with the testicles to raise tax, vote Labour.
      It also seems strange that you think we want more from the state than we are willing to pay for. Feeding your kids is not something we ‘want’ from the state – its a basic human right that should not be used as any sort of political football.
      We want basic services from the state. Bailing out the bankers was the cheapest option at the time – yet since then there has been very little done to make bankers pay back bailout money.

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