Proportion of Isle of Wight five-year-olds hitting school target fell last year

Practitioners are supportive of the assessment because it helps teachers plan the next stage for that child, but figures for 2016-2017 show Isle of Wight children are behind the national average in some development levels by the time they leave reception class.

radar - five year old attainment

Fewer five-year-olds on the Isle of Wight achieved a good level of development in 2016-2017, according to standards set by the Department for Education.

Over the last school year, 71.2% of the pupils reached this standard in the early years assessment. The average rate for England was 69%.

How the development is assessed
The department benchmark for children with a “good level of development” is to achieve the minimum expected level in five of the seven areas assessed.

These are personal, social and emotional development, physical development, communication and language, mathematics and literacy.

The evaluation is made by the teacher in the final term of Reception.

Literacy lowest level of achievement
The subject where most pupils met the minimum expected score on the Isle of Wight was physical development. About 89.4% of the pupils hit the mark.

The lowest level of achievement was in literacy – just 75% of pupils met the Government’s minimum required mark.

Improvements in language
The topic where children improved their rate of success the most was communication and language. About 85.3% met the level expected, up from 77.1% in 2015-2016.

A total of 1,360 pupils were evaluated on the Isle of Wight in 2016-2017, 642 girls and 718 boys.

The average mark across all the areas assessed was 33.2, out of a possible 51.

In England, the average mark was 34.5 in 2016-2017.

Girls on the Isle of Wight did better than boys, scoring on average 1.7 more points.

Important info for teachers
Rosamund McNeil, assistant general secretary at the National Education Union, considered the assessment positive in terms of helping teachers and parents know more about children’s capabilities.

She said:

“The purpose of this assessment is to gather information and help teachers plan the next stage for that child.

“Practitioners are really supportive of it and they are very worried because they feel the Government does not like it because it is not just limited to numeracy and literacy.”

McNeil: Gender not critical at this stage
Commenting on the better performance by girls, she added:

“Gender is one of the factors, but not critical at this stage. You also have to take into account that 20% of the kids may have some additional need and it really matters which month in the year children were born.

“Every child develops at a different pace from the age of three to 18, and that is something that everybody has to understand.”


Article shared by Data Reporter as part of OnTheWight’s collaboration with Press Association and Urbs Media

Thursday, 9th August, 2018 8:31am

By

ShortURL: http://wig.ht/2ll6

Filed under: Education, Island-wide, Isle of Wight News, Top story

Any views or opinions presented in the comments below are solely those of the author and do not represent those of OnTheWight.

Leave your Reply

5 Comments on "Proportion of Isle of Wight five-year-olds hitting school target fell last year"

  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Email updates?
Rupert Besley
Is there a mistake in this report or is it just me having difficulty following it? The figures quoted in para 3 appear to contradict what is stated in para 1 and is central to the headline. (Maybe I’ve misunderstood dates, assuming ‘2017’ meant this ‘last school year’ – in which case further clarity over 2016-17 & 2017-18 would be helpful. But I don’t think that is… Read more »
Sally Perry

No mistake in the article, figures quoted in the article relate to the last school year (2016-2017). The figures have not been released for the current school year (2017-18) yet.
I have added clarity to Miguel’s article to any further avoid confusion.

Rupert Besley
In which case I’m still lost – or being incredibly dim, for which I must apologise. But how do these 2 statements fit together (and with the headline): ‘figures for 2016-2017 show Isle of Wight children are behind the national average in development levels by the time they leave reception class… Over the last school year, 71.2% of the pupils reached this standard in the early years… Read more »
Sally Perry

I can see how that would be confusing, so have added ‘some’ to the excerpt text.

The average mark across all the areas assessed was 33.2 on the Isle of Wight, the average mark in England was 34.5.

Rupert Besley
Well, thank you, but… I’m sorry to have to continue with this, but it still makes no sense to me. The report (as first posted) led with the statement that early years assessments for Island children came out below the national average. In the 3rd paragraph it says that 71.2% of Island children reached the set standard, that is above the 69% given as average rate for… Read more »