‘Personae Vectenses: Isle of Wight Notables’ from Queen Osburga to Alan Titchmarsh (updated)

Published by Beachy Books, ‘Personae Vectenses: Isle of Wight Notables’ is written by Island-born, Phillip Armitage, and is a labour of love that took him twelve years of research

Front Cover - Personae Vectenses - Isle of Wight Notables

What has the mother of King Alfred, a famous sail maker, a seismology pioneer, and the vice admiral who introduced the guinea and snuff to England all got in common?

They are all among 246 short biographies of ‘notables’ who find themselves in the latest book from Isle of Wight publisher, Beachy Books.

‘Personae Vectenses: Isle of Wight Notables’ is written by Island-born, Phillip Armitage, and is a labour of love that took him twelve years of research, as Phillip explains:

“I just kept stumbling across these names in various Isle of Wight books that I collect. And they all had connections to the Island, some famous, others I’d never heard of. I decided that there were so many names with an Isle of Wight link that it was worth putting together as a publication.”

All started with Dudley Pound
The notable that inspired him first was Dudley Pound.

“I’d never even heard of him so I did some digging around and found out about him. He was Admiral of the Fleet and he defended England against the U-Boat threat. He was born in Wroxall.”

An Islander through and through
Born on the Island, Phillip was educated here before moving away to go to university and work.

“I’m now retired and living in Worcester, but I’m an Islander through and through. My father landed on the Isle of Wight in 1937, moving from Oldham, Lancashire, when he got a job at Saunders-Roe.”

Where and when
‘Personae Vectenses: Isle of Wight Notables’ retails at £12.99 and will be officially published on Thursday 17th October 2019.

The book will be available at Island retailers including Babushka Books in Shanklin, Medina Books in Cowes, and Isle of Wight Traders and Waterstones in Newport.

The book is also available from Amazon.

Article edit
13.10.2019 9:20 – Quote from PA corrected and details of where to buy added


News shared by Philip Bell on behalf of Beachy Books. Ed

© 2019 Beachy Books

Friday, 11th October, 2019 12:24pm

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5 Comments on "‘Personae Vectenses: Isle of Wight Notables’ from Queen Osburga to Alan Titchmarsh (updated)"

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nitonboy

Far too many ‘famous’ Islanders only took long holidays here or retired here. Not true Islanders really.
Plus author says born & bred on the Island but came from Oldham with his father who worked for SR. Which is which?

Sally Perry

The author of the press release has been in touch to advise he provided the incorrect wording about the origins of the book’s author. The quote has now been updated and reads as,

“I’m now retired and living in Worcester, but I’m an Islander through and through. My father landed on the Isle of Wight in 1937, moving from Oldham, Lancashire, when he got a job at Saunders-Roe.”

temperance

Not Ethnically diverse enough, all seem to be white. Is it not rather racist.

beachybooks
The book is not racist. I assume this comment has come from simply reading the edited press release and judging the book by the cover. Somebody may argue the ‘notables’ in the book are not diverse enough, but that is no fault of the author. The notables were collected over 12 years, and included simply using this criteria, to quote the author: “They had to have lived… Read more »
beachybooks

For those who are interested, there’s a book by James Rayner called ‘The Isle of Wight’s Missing Chapter’ which tells the story of the Island’s international visitors and residents, which features many diverse people who visited the Island over the years or who have connections, some found in Personae Vectenses, and is a very interesting read.