Military Road resurfacing works extended, but end is in sight

The stretch of road is one of the UK’s best-known and most photographed sections of highway and the longest consecutive length of road upgraded by Island Roads in a single scheme, as part of the Highways PFI.

Military Road media

Resurfacing work on the seven-and-a-half-mile stretch of the Military Road between Chale and Brook is almost complete.

There have been some slight delays to the work being completed due to weather and ground conditions, but all things being well, Island Roads say they hope the work will come to an end next Tuesday (6th November).

The stretch of road is one of the UK’s best-known and most photographed sections of highway and the longest consecutive length of road upgraded by Island Roads in a single scheme, as part of the Highways PFI.

Background on the road
According to Island Roads, the road was built by the military in the 1860s as part of the defence of the Island (hence the name Military Road) and it enabled troops to patrol the south west coastline from their barracks in Freshwater.

It was for many years closed to the public with a series of gates restricting access, but after being purchased from the War Office and the Seely Estate, the road was reconstructed and public access established in the 1930s.

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Thursday, 1st November, 2018 5:29pm

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Filed under: Brook, Chale, Island-wide, Isle of Wight News, Roads, Top story, West Wight

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3 Comments on "Military Road resurfacing works extended, but end is in sight"

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richardshanklinite

Perhaps they can now repair the roads they have previously resurfaced which are now breaking up.

Colin
There are an increasing number of freshly laid roads that are cracking up, both at the edges and along the centre of the roads. Whilst the top surface is reasonable to begin with, it is becoming increasingly apparent that insufficient work is being done to the foundations. I expect the usual excuse of blue slipper clay will be trotted out, but we all know about that and… Read more »
Andrew Garratt
A point I made to Cabinet member, Cllr Ian Ward, at yesterday’s policy and scrutiny meeting. In Noke Common Road, for example, one crack is 30cm deep in places. I’ve been told some of this is due to the summer weather drying out the subsoil. If we have more weather like it – and it’s probable – then how many more roads will develop cracks. With cold,… Read more »