Isle of Wight County Press shareholders sell out to mainland co Newsquest

Ignoring calls made by the MP, as well as the CP journalists and those trying to put together a community bid, to delay their decision, the shareholders voted to a sell out to mainland publisher, Newsquest.

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The shareholders of the Isle of Wight County Press group met on the mainland yesterday to vote on whether to sell their shares to mammoth news publisher, Newsquest.

The buyout by the publisher – which has over 200 titles across the UK – was agreed at an Extraordinary General Meeting of the shareholders in Chandlers Ford.

The sale comes despite calls for a delay from Isle of Wight Conservative MP, Bob Seely , a semi-retired businessman who wanted to submit a community bid and 99% of the journalists working on the paper.

Response from staff
Editor of the County Press, Alan Marriott, said,

“I look forward to working with the management of Newsquest.”

OnTheWight has written to the father of County Press NUJ chapel for a comment about the sale, but at time of publishing had not heard back. We’ll update when we do.

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Having published just short of 30,000 articles over nearly 12 years and picking up industry awards along the way for innovation (reporting live from IWC meetings from as early as 2007), we’re told OnTheWight has been responsible for changing the media landscape on the Island.

We’re not a multi-million pound organisation with dozens of staff, but a dedicated, grass-roots team of reporters and writers.

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Thursday, 13th July, 2017 2:27pm

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ShortURL: http://wig.ht/2fsU

Filed under: Business, Island-wide, Isle of Wight County Press, Isle of Wight News, Media, Print, Top story

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Any views or opinions presented in the comments below are solely those of the author and do not represent those of OnTheWight.

7 Comments

  1. CHEEKY. That’s clever, anticipating probable changes imposed on the County Press by its new owners, Newsquest, OTW takes this opportunity to promotes itself.
    And why not?

  2. steephilljack


    13.Jul.2017 6:54pm

    Shareholders want profit and sell the paper down the Medina to the mainland.
    Alan Marriott would say that wouldn’t he, if he wants to keep his job for a while ?
    I make a monthly contribution to OnTheWight and give them a bit more than I pay for CP each month. I suggest you do the same: keep it local !

  3. the auditor


    14.Jul.2017 8:24am

  4. Postscript


    14.Jul.2017 8:29am

    I can’t imagine that many local newspapers have survived in this changed media landscape. In fact I understand that many have not survived; the County Press is probably one of the more successful in the UK. People want their news delivery in a digital format.. and yet the CP survives, for now. Buoyed up by the older generation and those not comfortable with technology it manages to survive very nicely. But in 15 or so years I’m not sure that it will still be here. Perhaps the IOW is a technological dead zone and paper news will survive here but it’s archaic and wasteful and if all the trend forecasts come to pass it’s surely going to be dead in the water by 2030?

    • It’s just typical that a local enterprise gets swallowed up by a larger organisation.
      It might be for the better but I doubt it. Having said that, the County Press is quite boring in its content.

  5. FAKE NEWS? Unquestionably the digital revolution has seen many newspapers close and others become borderline with uncertain futures.
    The problem is that no-one (that’s US the readers) wants to pay for their news so publishers are cutting costs and instead of employing professional journalists are using amateurs to write any old guff to fill their sites.
    At the same time traditional news sources such as courts, councils, health authorities and emergency services are either unreported or ‘newspapers’ rely on public relations officers for coverage.
    The rate of change has been dramatic and that is bad for accountability, transparency and democracy.
    Worse still, few are scratching the surface of these news items or asking probing questions although OTW, with its limited resources, is one of the few exceptions.

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